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The Rising Sun and Boma

Tuesday 16 December 2014, author(s)-editor(s) Kenneth Usongo

The Rising Sun and Boma interrogate social evils such as moral decadence, corruption, and greed that are rife in the Cameroonian society. In both plays, Ipah, Paddy, Dinna, and Boma, for example, exemplify how waywardness and avarice can subvert moral integrity. At the same time, the plays problematise the intersection of tradition and modernity, articulating the tension inherent in both visions of life. Although the moral landscape of the drama appears sordid, characters like Abu Ipah and Joseph enkindle hope. Initially performed seventeen years ago, the plays are still as poignant as they are didactic and hilarious as they are refreshing. The characters are credible and compelling partly because of the felicitous language that is anchored in the local imagery.

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ISBN 9789956792535 | 126 pages | 203 x 127mm | 2014 | Langaa RPCIG, Cameroon | Paperback

2 Book Reviews

  • The Rising Sun and Boma 16 December 2014 08:45, author(s)-editor(s) Jeff Moser, University of Denver, USA

    “Usongo’s plays are most refreshing, comedic, and yet, in a subtle way, offer dramatic glimpses into the vulnerabilities of being human. They suggest customs and moral codes, while serving essential purposes such as social bonding and religion, invite and inspire the human propensity and preference for rites, ordering, and faith, which sustain behaviors and ideals over time. However, when tradition and beliefs are challenged or bent by experience and ‘reality’, they can also lead to new truths.”

    Jeff Moser, University of Denver, USA

  • The Rising Sun and Boma 16 December 2014 08:46, author(s)-editor(s) Dr Kelvin Ngong Toh, Department of English, University of Buea, (...)

    “The Rising Sun and Boma are compelling plays – well-crafted, touching, and ironical as humans struggle to survive in a world that is challenging to define.”

    Dr Kelvin Ngong Toh, Department of English, University of Buea, Cameroon